How electricity flow in an electric bike works?

Batteries are the most important part of our electric bicycles as we all know. That’s why we do intense research and decide carefully before we buy a battery. We try to find the best battery that fits our conversion kits and therefore we have so many questions in mind.

One of the most asked questions is “Can I use a 1000W battery with a 500W conversion kit?”. The answer to this question is yes, technically you should not have any problem with that.

Here comes the second question, “But, how?”.

The reason why people are concerned about it is the lack of enough information about how the electricity flows inside an electric bicycle.

First off, do not think about the electricity flow as the battery pushes the electricity to the controller or the hub motor. Unfortunately, many people think this way and it leads to confusion. General idea is if we put a 1000W battery to a 500W conversion kit, then the battery will push 1000W to the controller and it will damage the whole kit or the controller at least. But it is not like that in fact. Batteries do not control how much electricity goes through the system.

What controls the flow is the controller. It will drag or let us say pull electricity from the battery according to the capacity it has.

For example, assume that we have a 500W controller and a 1000W battery. In this case, the controller can pull 500W maximum from the battery and it’s totally fine. There will not be any issues with that as long as the battery, the source in other words, has more power than the controller pulls.

So in short, the controller or the system pulls electricity and from there the controller organizes the power amount to be delivered depending on riders choice whether he or she wants to pedal or go on full throttle.

We hope this article will help you to have an idea about how the power/ electricity flows through the system of an electric bike.

EbikeEbikelingElectricFlowHubmotor